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Latest Projects

Research project (§ 26 & § 27)
Duration : 2020-11-01 - 2022-07-31

The project focuses on the development of suitable measures for the promotion of wild bees and the optimization of habitats using the example of the Vienna Danube Island. The measures will be implemented together with the City of Vienna (MA 45) and their effectiveness will be evaluated. At the same time, wild bee surveys from 2005 will be repeated on selected sites in order to make a shift in the species spectrum of wild bees visible in the longer term.
Research project (§ 26 & § 27)
Duration : 2021-04-01 - 2021-08-31

Revision of the domestic cat study by Hackländer et al. 2014 and consideration of the latest scientific findings since publication. In addition, the situation in Germany will be addressed in particular. A special focus will be the question of hybridization between wild and domestic cats. For this purpose, current findings from master theses at BOKU on the space-time use of sympatric domestic and wild cats will be integrated in addition to the available literature. Evaluation of a survey in Schleswig-Holstein on hunters' experiences with domestic cats. Descriptive presentation of the results and written elaboration of the survey results, interpretation as well as conclusions regarding the importance of domestic cats for hunting. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
Research project (§ 26 & § 27)
Duration : 2017-03-01 - 2018-12-31

The von Bertalanffy equation was developed in the 1940s and has since been the almost universal biologically motivated model to describe the ontogenetic growth of different species; it is characterized by the metabolic exponents a = 2/3, b = 1. West et al. (1997, 2001) suggested another pair of metabolic exponents (a = 2/3, b = 1) and provided biological reasoning for this choice. This project proposes biological reasoning for yet two other exponent pairs based on the ideas of Bertalanffy and West about metabolism and on a model of Parks (1982) about the dependency of growth on food intake.

Supervised Theses and Dissertations