Die LTS LunchTimeSeries on Law, Technology and Society startet ins Sommersemester 2019!

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Iris Eisenberger, M.Sc. (LSE), Universität für Bodenkultur Wien, und Univ.-Prof. Dr. Konrad Lachmayer, Sigmund Freud Privatuniversität Wien, organisieren die erfolgreiche Vortragsreihe bereits das siebente Semester in Folge.

Im Sommersemester 2019 beginnt die Reihe am 17. Mai mit einem Vortrag von Prof. Claudia Müller-Birn, Freie Universität Berlin, zum Thema "Bringing the human to the center of algorithmic systems design: challenges and opportunities". Die Ankündigung finden Sie hier.

Am 12. Juni ist Prof. Sebastian Pfotenhauer, Technische Universität München (TUM), zu Gast und hält einen Vortrag zu "Testing future Societies? Developing a framework for test beds and living labs as instruments of innovation governance". Die Ankündigung finden Sie hier.

Den dritten Vortrag hält Dr. Jack Stilgoe, University College London (UCL). Er spricht am 27. Juni über "How experiments become futures - Social learning for self-driving cars". Die Ankündigung finden Sie hier.

Nach den Vorträgen laden wir zur öffentlichen Diskussion ein. In anglo-amerikanischer Tradition wird für Verpflegung gesorgt. Die Veranstaltung ist frei zugänglich; die Teilnahme ist kostenlos.

Wir ersuchen um Anmeldung unter law(at)boku.ac.at.

Das gesamte Programm als PDF finden Sie hier.

Bringing the human to the center of algorithmic systems design: challenges and opportunities

Bringing the human to the center of algorithmic systems design: challenges and opportunities

Vortragende: Prof. Dr. Claudia Müller-Birn, Freie Universität Berlin

Datum: Freitag, 17. Mai 2019
Zeit: 12:00 - 13:30
Ort: Seminarraum SR 02, Erdgeschoß, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Wien (Guttenberghaus)

Die Teilnahme ist kostenlos. Um Anmeldung bis Mittwoch, 15. Mai 2019 wird gebeten: law(at)boku.ac.at

"Drawing from my many years of experience of the open peer production system Wikipedia, Claudia Müller-Birn introduces various means of quality assurance mechanisms that effectively combine human and algorithmic activities. By using one example of a machine learning-based, i.e., algorithmic, system, she will show possible sources of biases and explain how we can re-interprete these sources into points of participation, where humans are urgently needed to monitor, validate, configure the algorithmic systems. From these experiences, Müller-Birn infers the concept of human-machine collaboration and introduces first design parameters. Based on the provided insights, she outlines a possible integrative design approach for algorithmic systems."

Claudia Müller-Birn is the head of the research group Human-Centered Computing (hcc.mi.fu-berlin.de) at the Institute of Computer Science at the Freie Universität Berlin. Before her appointment at FU Berlin, she under-took a post-doc at the Carnegie Mellon University, based on a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation. Her interdisciplinary research advances the fields of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and Social Computing. She is especially interest-ed in investigating human-machine collaboration in which the collective intelligence of humans intertwines with machine intelligence.

Testing future Societies? Developing a framework for test beds and living labs as instruments of innovation governance

Testing future Societies? Developing a framework for test beds and living labs as instruments of innovation governance

Vortragender: Prof. Dr. Sebastian Pfotenhauer, Technische Universität München (TUM)

Datum: Mittwoch, 12. Juni 2019
Zeit: 12:00 - 13:30
Ort: Seminarraum SR 01, Erdgeschoß, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Wien (Guttenberghaus)

Die Teilnahme ist kostenlos. Um Anmeldung bis Montag, 10. Juni 2019 wird gebeten: law(at)boku.ac.at

"Test beds and living labs have emerged as a prominent approach to foster innovation across geographical regions and technical domains. They represent an experimental approach to innovation policy that aims at once to test, demonstrate, and advance new sociotechnical arrangements in a model environment under real-world conditions. In this talk, I develop an analytic framework for this distinctive approach to innovation. Our findings suggest that test beds do not simply test a technology under real-world conditions. Rather, they equally “test” society around a new set of technologies and associated modes of governance based on par-ticular visions of the future – occasionally against considerable resistance."

Sebastian Pfotenhauer is Assistant Professor of Innovation Research at the Munich Center for Technology in Society (MCTS) and the TUM School of Management, both Technical University of Munich. He is also the coordinator of the EU-Horizon2020 project SCALINGS. His research interests include science and innovation in international settings as well as co-creation and responsible innovation. He holds an S.M. in Technology Policy from MIT and a PhD in Physics from the University of Jena, Germany, and has received post-doctoral training at MIT and Harvard.

How experiments become futures - Social learning for self-driving cars

How experiments become futures - Social learning for self-driving cars

Vortragender: Dr. Jack Stilgoe, University College London (UCL)

Datum: Donnerstag, 27. Juni 2019
Zeit: 12:00 - 13:30
Ort: Seminarraum SR 02, Erdgeschoß, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Wien (Guttenberghaus)

Die Teilnahme ist kostenlos. Um Anmeldung bis Dienstag, 25. Juni 2019 wird gebeten: law(at)boku.ac.at

"Self-driving cars are currently learning to drive. Alongside well-publicised developments in machine learning, this also involves a more complicated process of social learning. Understanding and governing the politics of this technology means asking ‘Who is learning, what are they learning and how are they learning?’ On-road trials taking place in cities around the world offer a window into the social complexities of a debate that is often presented as technical. In his lecture, Jack Stilgoe will report on his previous research on the chaotic self-driving experimentation that has already taken place and describe the approach of his team’s new project “Driverless Futures?”."

Dr. Jack Stilgoe is an associate professor in Science and Technology Studies at UCL. He works on science and technology policy, particularly the governance of emerging technologies. Among other publications, he is the author of Experiment Earth: Responsible innovation in geoengineering. He leads “Driverless Futures?”, a three-year project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council to investigate how self-driving car technologies can be governed in the public interest.